Local Attractions

Downtown St. Louis

 

St. Louis City

Journey to the top of the Gateway Arch, interact with butterflies, try your hand at some science experiments or immerse yourself in a little arts and culture – it’s all in a day’s fun in St. Louis, Missouri. From sports and shopping to tours and attractions, check out what St. Louis has to offer.

Whether you’re a permanent resident or in town for a few days, St. Louis has plenty of activities filled with culture and Midwest fun for all!

A Brief History of St. Louis. Pierre Laclede Liguest, recipient of a land grant from the King of France, and his 13-year-old scout, Auguste Chouteau, selected the site of St. Louis in 1764 as a fur trading post.

 

 

St. Louis Arch

 

St. Louis Arch

The Gateway Arch is a 630-foot (192 m) monument in St. Louis in the U.S. state of Missouri. Clad in stainless steel and built in the form of an inverted, weighted catenary arch, it is the world’s tallest arch, the tallest monument in the Western Hemisphere, and Missouri’s tallest accessible building. Built as a monument to the westward expansion of the United States, it is the centerpiece of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial and has become an internationally famous symbol of St. Louis.

Your visit to the Gateway Arch is not complete without journeying to the top of the awe-inspiring, 630’ foot tall Gateway Arch. From the top of the tallest man-made monument in the United States and highest point in downtown St. Louis, you will experience unforgettable views of the city and the Mississippi River.

 

 

 

 

Bush Stadium

 

Bush Stadium

Busch Memorial Stadium, also known as Busch Stadium II, was a multi-purpose sports facility in St. Louis, Missouri that operated from 1966 to 2005.

The stadium served as the home of the St. Louis Cardinals National League baseball team for its entire operating existence, while also serving as home to the National Football League’s Cardinals team from 1966 to 1987. It opened four days after the last baseball game was played at Sportsman’s Park (which had also been known since 1953 as Busch Stadium).

The stadium was designed by Sverdrup & Parcel and built by Grün & Bilfinger. Edward Durell Stone designed the roof, a 96-arch “Crown of Arches”. The Crown echoed the Gateway Arch, which had been completed only a year before Busch Stadium opened. It was one of the first multipurpose “cookie-cutter” facilities built in the United States, popular from the early 1960s through the early 1980s.
The stadium was demolished by wrecking ball in late-2005 and part of its former footprint is occupied by its replacement stadium—the new Busch Stadium (aka Busch Stadium III).

The design of the new Busch Stadium took into account the context of downtown St. Louis, the colorful history of the Cardinals, and the best attributes of the most successful ballparks built around baseball since the construction of Oriole Park at Camden Yards in 1992. With classic arched openings recalling the nearby Cupples Station warehouses to the rich warm colors of the Wainright building, this ballpark is inspired by the classics. However, its creative use of old and new materials, from brick and concrete to exposed steel and glass, creates an architectural statement that stands on its own, with a modern sensibility appropriate for the 21st century.

St. Louis Sculpture Park

 

St. Louis Sculpture Park

Laumeier Sculpture Park is a living laboratory where artists and audiences explore the relationship between contemporary art and the natural environment.

105-acre open-air museum and Sculpture Park located in Sunset Hills, Missouri, near St. Louis and is maintained in partnership with St. Louis County Parks and Recreation Department. It houses over 60 outdoor sculptures and features a 1.4-mile (2.3 km) walking trail, and educational programs. There is also an indoor gallery, an 1816 Tudor stone mansion, which was the former residence of Henry and Matilda Laumeier. Laumeier is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The park sees about 300,000 visitors each year.

 

Ted Drewes

 

Ted Drewes

It all started with Ted Drewes Sr., who was a St. Louis attraction, winning the Muny Tennis Championships each year from 1925 to 1936. He also won the National Public Parks Singles title four straight years in the middle of the 1920’s. During the 1930’s he traveled with his family to Florida each winter to continue playing tennis. Ted Sr. opened his first frozen custard store in Florida in 1929. In 1930, he opened another store on Natural Bridge Road in St. Louis and the South Grand store in 1931. In 1941, the family opened a second South Side stand which is the current Chippewa location on historic Route 66. By 1958, the two South Side stands were all that remained.